Legislative District 13

The Gilbert Chamber of Commerce is invested in identifying those candidates who will best represent the interests of the business community while serving in office. As such, we invited all candidates to respond to both written and video-response questionnaires which address a variety of issues impacting our businesses. These responses, as well as consideration for each candidate's demonstrated actions, were scored to issue a letter grades.

We recognize the need for well-rounded, knowledgeable elected leaders. We encourage our membership to reach out to candidates and to access available resources in an effort to cast an informed and confident vote.

When it comes to business issues, how do you rate these candidates? Click here to download a scoring worksheet for LD 13 candidates.

The following candidates participated in the process, but did not advance to the General Election:

  • Ron Hardin (A)
  • Josh Askey (B)

The following candidates did not participate in the process:

  • SENATE: JD Mesnard, Cynthia Hans
  • HOUSE: Julie Willoughby

Candidates are listed by final ranking:

Jennifer Pawlik (House)

​About The Candidate

  • Email: JenniferPawlikforAZ@gmail.com
  • Community of Residence: Chandler
  • How many years have you lived in this community? 14 years
  • Name of Employer State of Arizona
  • Occupation or Title Representative
  • Campaign website or social media account www.jenniferpawlik.com
  • Brief Summary of Employment History
    • 2019-Present Representative, Arizona House of Representatives
    • 2015-Present Instructor, NAU
    • 2013-2019 Executive Trainer, Spalding Education International
    • 2007-2016 Teacher, Chandler Unified
  • Educational Background
    • Bachelor’s of Science, Elementary Education, NAU, 1996
    • Masters of Education, Curriculum & Instruction, NAU 2010
  • Community organizations to which you belong or regularly support
    • Sun Lakes Democratic Club

Questionnaire Responses

1. Give three (3) qualifications/skill sets that make you a leading candidate for Arizona State Legislature. Explain why these qualifications make you a better candidate than your opponents.

Three qualifications I have that make me a leading candidate for the Arizona State Legislature include that I am the incumbent, I am a listener, and I am detail-oriented. Because I am an incumbent, I have knowledge of the way things work at the legislature, and I have connections with people at the capitol. Because I listen to others, I can better understand their position. This helps me to represent the community. Being detail-oriented ensures that I collect all the information I need to make decisions. I read a great deal, and I take copious notes. I ask lots of questions to ensure I understand the policy or issue.

2. What is your vision for the state of Arizona in the next 20 to 30 years?

I am a “glass half-full” type of person. My vision for the state of Arizona in the next 20-30 years is that we return to a time where people trust and respect one another even if they don’t agree on policies or share the same political party. I would like to see an AZ where people can afford to own homes in the communities where they work. I’d like to see properly funded schools (PK- universities) that prepare students for the positions businesses are seeking to fill. It would be great to have a solution to our water shortages and increased use of green energy-including solar.

3. What are the top three (3) priorities you would like to see accomplished during your term as a member of the legislature and why do you believe these are important to accomplish?

The most important priority is education of our children because a strong education system will encourage businesses to relocate to Arizona (and stay here). It will ensure that our children are prepared for good-paying jobs. I very strongly believe that a good education is the ticket out of poverty. As our state continues to grow, we will require water to drink, for agriculture, and for industry. We must plan for the future generations in a thoughtful manner that includes stakeholders from all areas of the state. Finally, we need to rebuild trust in our election systems. I want eligible voters to be able to cast a ballot in the way that is most convenient for them; over the last two decades, most people have voted-by-mail. There has been very little fraud.

4. What do you believe is the preferred way to accomplish funding for education (at all levels) and what should the role of the State be in that funding?

I believe the state has a great role in education funding. The funding formula does need to be reworked however. We are using a funding formula that was created in 1980, before there were charter schools and open enrollment. It costs more to educate both children in general education and those with special needs now than it did in 1980. It also costs more to educate children who are living in poverty. The ROI on quality preschool programs is tremendous. It is something we should strongly consider. Additionally, funding should be equitable regardless of where students live.

5. How would you propose to address health care costs and affordability in Arizona?

When considering health care costs, particularly for those who are on AHCCCS, it is critical that we are proactive-it actually saves money. One specific example of this is that pregnant women who receive dental care have better birth outcomes, but we don’t allow them to receive this care when they are AHCCC patients. I was a co-sponsor on a bill diabetes management program for those on AHCCCS. The program will teach the patients how to manage their diabetes so that their health outcomes are better (and less expensive).

6. If elected to represent this legislative district, who would you consider to be your stakeholders and how would you propose to represent them?

The stakeholders are many. They include the people who live and work in the district. They include other elected officials and leaders in public safety, education and business. One thing people in the community often say about me is, “You show up.” I do. It is important to me that I have an open line of communication with the leaders in our community. I call them, and I attend meetings with them. This helps me understand the needs of the community I represent. My votes are sometimes different from others of my party because I have had conversations with the experts in our community, and I understand how the issue will impact the area where we live.

7. What experience do you have with complex budgets?

After serving two terms in the Arizona House of Representatives, I have had to consider many appropriations bills including those with “small” dollar asks of less than $100,000 up to the entire state budget which is more than $13 billion.

8. How would you propose to interact with the Gilbert Chamber of Commerce and how do you see your respective roles on issues that may come before the State Legislature?

When I am re-elected, I will continue my relationship with the Gilbert Chamber of Commerce. I will continue to reach out when there is an issue that impacts the businesses of Gilbert. I know that learning is a life-long activity, so I am more than happy to attend any programs where I can learn more about the work of the Chamber or gain more insight into Gilbert businesses.

9. What are your thoughts on repealing the State Statute that requires legislative approval for Maricopa County transportation spending?

It is very strange that ONLY Maricopa County requires the legislature’s approval for transportation spending. I am okay with repealing that statute.

10. What role does the legislature have regarding future public health emergencies and the impact on the business community?

This is a very tricky question. There was so much we didn’t know when the pandemic began. I believe decisions relating to health should be determined (or at the very least guided) by our public health department. I think it is important that the public understands that as we learn more about a public health issue, recommendations change. This doesn’t mean the recommendations were poor or wrong, it just means we have more/better information. The latest data should be used to inform decision making. This is also a very good example of why the relationship between the Chambers and the legislature should be strong.

11. What are specific issues where you envision yourself working with differing members of your own party or across the aisle?

In the legislature, most of the bills that are passed are done so with strong bipartisan support. Some big bills that I’ve worked across the aisle to pass include bills to increase funding for school counselors, dyslexia identification, expansion of pre-kindergarten, adult education bills, and bills that allow tax credits for the tech companies R & D expansion. It would be nice if the parties worked together on the state budget.

12. Do you have any final comments or thoughts you’d like to share?

Liz Harris (House)

About The Candidate

  • Email: lizharrismba@gmail.com
  • Community of Residence: Dpbson Place
  • How many years have you lived in this community? 23 years
  • Name of Employer: Liz Harris Realty
  • Occupation or Title: Broker/Owner
  • Campaign website or social media account: www.VoteLizHarris.com
  • Brief Summary of Employment History (list format)
    • 2005-Present Real Estate Sales
    • 1992-2005 Nutraceuticals manufacturing/sales
  • Education:
    • 1993 College of Mt St Vincent/Manhattan College, B.A. Mathematics/Comp Science Riverdale, NY
    • 1997 PACE University, Lubin School of Business, M.B.A. Marketing Management, Manhattan, NY
    • 1999 Capital University of Integrative Medicine Doctorate of Integrative Medicine, Washington, D.C.
  • Community organizations to which you belong or regularly support (list format)
    • Girl Scouts of America (Lifetime Member) Troop Leader 2009-2020
    • Dobson Place HOA, Social Director 2010-Present
    • Neighborhood Easter Egg Hunt Coordinator 2011-Present
    • Government Affairs Committee SEVRAR 2012-2020


Questionnaire Responses

1. The three qualifications that make me a leading candidate for Arizona State Legislature are as follows:

  1. Not afraid to do the work under heavy opposition – As exhibited over the last 18 months I have been researching election integrity and discovering anomalies that are often not spoken about. I did this as a citizen under the employ of no one. In fact, I refused all donations. Election Integrity is a non-partisan issue and I am proud to have accomplished what I did despite the backlash I received from media and both parties.
  2. Intelligence – I am never rash to make a decision (unless a fast decision is needed). I think things through very carefully and listen to all sides. The reason I state “intelligence” is because it takes a level of discernment to be intelligent. I need to ask questions and not only listen to someone by observe their actions. This is a skill that I recognize not everyone has and I feel very blessed to possess this skill.
  3. Listening – Just this past week someone complimented me as being the world’s best listener. Granted when I am passionate about a topic I am sure I interrupt at times. However, an elected leader MUST do more listening that speaking. I find that the best way to learn is to listen more and talk less.

2. What is your vision for the state of Arizona in the next 20 to 30 years?

My vision for Arizona is to maintain sustainable growth over the next 20-30 years while quality of life remains high. Arizona is an attractive state for many reasons with the weather being the main attraction. Since I don’t have control of the weather, it is important that Arizona maintain great policy/low taxation for this to remain an attractive state for a) employers b) residents c) seasonal visitors d) tourists.

3. What are the top three (3) priorities you would like to see accomplished during your term as a member of the legislature and why do you believe these are important to accomplish?

Election Integrity, Election Integrity, Election Integrity – I would like to see:

  1. Bringing our economy back to the pre-COVID state. Focus on growth, growth and more growth.
  2. Developing incentive for the employers who are having a hard time finding employees to work.
  3. Ensuring our education system remains a high priority so families are more likely to relocate here.

4. What do you believe is the preferred way to accomplish funding for education (at all levels) and what should the role of the State be in that funding?

The state needs to make sure that the funds are collected and dispersed in a timely fashion. I believe there needs to be more transparency in our educational spending for the public to see. Recently, it was discovered that a school district had more in reserves that the public was led to believe. My question is, “Was there a need for a bond override?” The more transparency the better it is for all.

5. How would you propose to address health care costs and affordability in Arizona?

Healthcare Affordability – I am going to be unpopular here. You are what you eat. Take personal responsibility for your own healthcare and that will drive down costs for EVERYONE. What do I mean by this? I was immuno-comprised when COVID arrived. My antibodies attacking my system were through the roof. I worked with the medical professionals who understood that pharmaceuticals and elective surgeries came last. I consumed the right unprocessed anti-inflammatory foods for over a year and the auto-immune conditions resolved themselves. Of course, I am not saying this is the panacea for all but if I am going to select the candy bar over the apple, vodka over water, there are repercussions. As we age, the more important these decisions become.

6. If elected to represent this legislative district, who would you consider to be your stakeholders and how would you propose to represent them?

While the stakeholders are the constituents of Arizona, I would attend my Legislative District meetings regularly. In fact, I have already been doing that since I developed an interest in politics over 6 years ago. At these meetings, I would ask for time to give a legislative update and would love to take questions.

7. What experience do you have with complex budgets?

I currently sit as a Director on the National Association of REALTORS and just approved a budge of nearly half a billion dollars. I also sit on the Multiple Listing Service Board as a Director as well as the Local and State REALTOR associations which are all multi-million-dollar budgets.

8. How would you propose to interact with the Gilbert Chamber of Commerce and how do you see your respective roles on issues that may come before the State Legislature?

My interaction with any and all Chambers of Commerce would be to see that the businesses coming into the area provide growth for not just the area but meet Arizona’s objectives as well. Growth needs to be a long-term strategy. Planning needs to be done 20 to 50 years out. Strategic plans are meant to be living, breathing documents for the benefit of the constituents.

9. What are your thoughts on repealing the State Statute that requires legislative approval for Maricopa County transportation spending?

Until Maricopa County is broken into 4 counties (Maricopa county has become much too large), I would NOT support repealing the State Statute that requires legislative approval for Maricopa County transportation spending. Unfortunately, while transportation infrastructure is important, it needs to be money well spent.

10. What role does the legislature have regarding future public health emergencies and the impact on the business community?

Should there be any REAL future public health emergencies, businesses need to make their own decisions on how to handle their respective companies and NOT be mandated to do what the AZ Governor/Legislature dictates. I believe COVID was a real illness, but we killed more people (figuratively and literally) by forcing people out of business (while the large chains/internet companies were allowed to thrive) which was completely unnecessary and disgraceful. Why were flu deaths nearly non-existent in 2020

11. What are specific issues where you envision yourself working with differing members of your own party or across the aisle?

I envision myself working very closely with the Arizona First Caucus (stay tuned). I pledge to work across the aisle as long as it makes sense for the health of the Great State of Arizona.

12. Do you have any final comments or thoughts you’d like to share?

Thank you for reading. As you may see, I am not running to give the popular answers to grade high on this survey. I am running because I am a truth seeker. So much of what is happening in this state and country could have been avoided if the elections of 2020 were truly fair and secure. I have the receipts. This effected more than just a single race. I encourage you to do your own research and should you live in my legislative district I would adore your support regardless of your party. Truth matters.

Video Responses

Candidates Ron Hardin and Josh Askey did not advance to the General Election.

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